bryankonietzko:

These are the images I made for the end of our NYCC panel last week. I know these have already made the rounds on the internet, but I thought I should share them here for posterity and for the folks who might not have seen them. Much to my surprise, even my improvised farewell/thank you speech was transcribed and shared along with the images, which was really nice. Here are those words as well, edited by me to correct what my mumbling likely made unclear for the transcriber and/or to represent what I meant to say:

"This is a really big deal for us. It’s been twelve years since we came up with this whole Avatar universe together. Avatar means so many different things to so many different people. To me, when I think of the creation of it, I just think of me and Mike sitting at my computer in this little house I rented in Burbank. And we would just share the keyboard and take turns. And just over the span of two weeks we cracked open this universe together. And twelve and half years later it’s just blossomed into something so huge. And it’s such a big part of our lives and people’s all over the world. These characters are real to us. Not in a delusional way, but in an emotional way. They really mean a lot to me and I know to Mike as well. And we just want to say thanks."

The panel and the signing were an amazing experience and a fitting sendoff for the show, even though I agree with Janet, PJ, and Dave: this show will live on, beyond the release of its final episode, for a long time. And a huge thanks to you guys for all the awesome letters and gifts. The ATLA/LOK fandom is an amazing international community of thoughtful, warmhearted humans.

Love, Bryan

*_*

jakewyattriot:

Gerard Way and I have made a sci-fi one-shot for you, and you can buy it tomorrow, Oct 15th! It’s Edge of Spider Verse #5, from Marvel Comics.

I’ll post some finished pages here in a little while, (with color by Ian Herring) but first I though I’d share some process shots and development/design work for the story. We put a lot of work and a lot of love into this, and I can’t wait to see it all lettered up and in print.

-Jake

Oh wow!

timlarade:

Allison finally opens up a bit about her mom in today’s new Mush-A-Mush page!
Enjoy!
Head on over to the site to get caught up on this chapter, as well as the first three! Mush-A-Mush!

Allison would punch me for saying this, but she’s so cute when she’s angry.

timlarade:

Allison finally opens up a bit about her mom in today’s new Mush-A-Mush page!

Enjoy!

Head on over to the site to get caught up on this chapter, as well as the first three! Mush-A-Mush!

Allison would punch me for saying this, but she’s so cute when she’s angry.

Tags: comics

faitherinhicks:

I’m up super early due to a stomach ache, so I thought I’d post something while my insides get sorted. 

These are two pages from The Nameless City (my current comic project, check the tag for more stuff) that I redid. I don’t normally redraw comic pages, but one page required some heavy revisions, and I was pretty unhappy with the other page, so I figured I’d just scrap them and redo them (the original pages are on the left, the redone ones on the right). The nice thing about my recent switch to digital penciling is that “redoing” basically meant edits to the digital pencils, which I then printed out and re-inked. So I didn’t have to completely re-draw the pages from scratch. Bless you, digital  penciling! This was so much less time consuming than if I’d had to completely redraw the pages traditionally.

The revisions that I needed to do were on the second page (row two). My editor said that the way I’d drawn the top row of panels in the original page (on the left) made the character (Kai) look he was fainting, rather than stepping back, missing a step and falling backwards. I totally agree, and feel very ashamed for not noticing that when drawing the page originally! :D That is why I like working with an editor: they catch the things you miss. 

So I re-drew that row of panels, so now the focus is on Kai stepping backwards, rather than his dad rambling on. 

The other page (first row) is the previous page in the book, and it actually didn’t have any revision notes, but as I mentioned, I was unhappy with how I drew it. So I did some edits to the pencils, making the building a little more impressive, and adding in some bleeds (when a comic panel bleeds off the edge of a page) to make the panels have more impact.

To Bleed or Not to Bleed is something I’m always struggling with. I like bleeds a lot; I think they can have much more impact than non-bleed panels, because the panel becomes larger, and thus more “important” in a reader’s mind. Or that’s my theory at least. ;) I don’t really have a particular technique when using bleeds. I tend to use them intuitively, in instances when they feel “right.” But I tend to think less is more with bleeds, so I don’t like to always have panels bleeding off a page. It’s fun to break things up and try different things. Keeps the readers on their toes!

Anyway, hope you enjoyed this little peek into my process of trying to make the best comic possible. :) (Oh, and that is not final text, just text dropped in to make it easier for my editor to read & give me notes.)

non-holiday reblog!

I’m up super early due to a stomach ache, so I thought I’d post something while my insides get sorted. 

These are two pages from The Nameless City (my current comic project, check the tag for more stuff) that I redid. I don’t normally redraw comic pages, but one page required some heavy revisions, and I was pretty unhappy with the other page, so I figured I’d just scrap them and redo them (the original pages are on the left, the redone ones on the right). The nice thing about my recent switch to digital penciling is that “redoing” basically meant edits to the digital pencils, which I then printed out and re-inked. So I didn’t have to completely re-draw the pages from scratch. Bless you, digital  penciling! This was so much less time consuming than if I’d had to completely redraw the pages traditionally.

The revisions that I needed to do were on the second page (row two). My editor said that the way I’d drawn the top row of panels in the original page (on the left) made the character (Kai) look he was fainting, rather than stepping back, missing a step and falling backwards. I totally agree, and feel very ashamed for not noticing that when drawing the page originally! :D That is why I like working with an editor: they catch the things you miss. 

So I re-drew that row of panels, so now the focus is on Kai stepping backwards, rather than his dad rambling on. 

The other page (first row) is the previous page in the book, and it actually didn’t have any revision notes, but as I mentioned, I was unhappy with how I drew it. So I did some edits to the pencils, making the building a little more impressive, and adding in some bleeds (when a comic panel bleeds off the edge of a page) to make the panels have more impact.

To Bleed or Not to Bleed is something I’m always struggling with. I like bleeds a lot; I think they can have much more impact than non-bleed panels, because the panel becomes larger, and thus more “important” in a reader’s mind. Or that’s my theory at least. ;) I don’t really have a particular technique when using bleeds. I tend to use them intuitively, in instances when they feel “right.” But I tend to think less is more with bleeds, so I don’t like to always have panels bleeding off a page. It’s fun to break things up and try different things. Keeps the readers on their toes!

Anyway, hope you enjoyed this little peek into my process of trying to make the best comic possible. :) (Oh, and that is not final text, just text dropped in to make it easier for my editor to read & give me notes.)

Mansplaining

kurtbusiek:

There was a little back-and-forth this morning on Twitter about a question Gail Simone and Kelly Sue DeConnick were asked on a con panel, about how to write believable female characters. Deb Aoki wondered aloud (or a-tweet) whether male writers should be asked how to write believable male characters.

The conversation got me thinking (or at least typing), and here, preserved for questionable posterity, is what I had to say, somewhat edited for clarity:

I’ve never been asked how to write believable male characters. I have been asked how to write believable female characters, as if they’re alien beings or something.

“How do I write believable women?” from male writers, is essentially asking how to write characters that are different from you. But all characters are different from you, or should be, unless they’re you. Characters are individuals, not types. If you’re writing them as types, you’re doing it wrong.

All characters are like you in some ways, and not like you in others. How do you write the parts that aren’t like you? Same as you do with any character. You have eyes, ears and a brain. You write from observation, experience, research and analysis.

If you’re writing a woman, you’re not writing a “women.” Write her. That character, that individual. A person, not a category.

Hillary Clinton, Sally Ride, Honey Boo-Boo and Dolley Madison don’t all want the same things, don’t all try to get them the same way, don’t come from the same background, have the same families, education, outlook, etc. Just the same as a similar group of men.

Write characters from who they are, what they want, where they come from, how they challenge or hide from problems, etc. Characters are individuals. They behave like themselves, not like some monolithic expression of their gender, race, religion or whatever else.

If you’re a white agnostic from New England and you’re writing a white Catholic from Georgia, you’re writing someone who’s different from you, and you need to use observation, experience, analysis, projection and maybe research to get it right. Same thing if the character is a woman, or Hispanic, or transgender, or 180-degrees from you politically, or whatever. You are always writing characters who aren’t the same as you.

Write ‘em as individuals. What do they want? How are they trying to get it? Them, as individuals. Their gender, their skin color, their cultural context, their life experience, all of these things will shape who they are, what they want, how they approach life. Use it all.

If I’m writing a black woman from St. Louis who’s an ex-Navy aviator whose parents have doctorates, she’s going to be way different from a blonde popstar millionaire who grew up an orphan. That they’re both women is only one part of them, and I need to write from all of it.

With any character, it comes back to: Who are they, where do they come from, what do they want, how do they try to get it? Any character.

Also useful advice if you find yourself writing alien beings. Or your neighbor.

Great writing advice from the one & only Kurt Busiek (who also wrote the introduction to Superhero Girl). :D

Tags: comics writing

avatar-e:

Aang’s all grown up

I really enjoyed this.

(via eversartdump)

pigeonbits:

A little sketchbook diary comic I drew today.  I get the feeling a lot of people go through this, adjuncts or not.

The challenges of the comics/work balance.

Tags: comics

uhhh I have a problem

uhhh I have a problem

unicorn-brigade:

Tiny Aang with an even tinier Appa! 
Experimenting with the new brushes in Kyle T Webster’s updated watercolor set.

Tiniest Aang! :D

unicorn-brigade:

Tiny Aang with an even tinier Appa! 

Experimenting with the new brushes in Kyle T Webster’s updated watercolor set.

Tiniest Aang! :D

(via timlarade)