HEY, TUMBLR. I HAVE MOVIE NEWS.

rainbowrowell:

DREAMWORKS PLANS TO MAKE AN ELEANOR & PARK MOVIE.

CROSS YOUR FINGERS.

image

CONGRATS RAINBOW!!!

*confetti everywhere*

tarabba said: Dis is lovely! :D What program have you been using if ya don’t me asking?

Manga Studio! I have version 5. Bought it pretty much for the perspective tool. 

itseasytoremember said: GOSH you’ve got such a talent for creating such intriguing characters and making me want to read more!!!!

Thanks, although these characters aren’t mine. They’re part of the X-Men universe. Here’s Marrow and Callisto’s Wikipedia pages.

More digital comic practice. This one went a lot smoother than the last one. 

Anyway, I like Marrow, even though she’s been ill-served by some writers at Marvel. I like making up stories about her when she was a kid and lived in the sewers with the Morlocks, because why not. 

practicing drawing dudes from my comic, yep yep.

practicing drawing dudes from my comic, yep yep.

oh guess what I finished playing. I looooooooooved it. Especially the ending.
This was supposed to be a digital comics test (all drawn on the cintiq), but it got entirely out of hand. Oh well, enjoy!

oh guess what I finished playing. I looooooooooved it. Especially the ending.

This was supposed to be a digital comics test (all drawn on the cintiq), but it got entirely out of hand. Oh well, enjoy!

tarabba:

zackules:

Here’s a comic I made a little while ago. I considered not posting it here because it’s a little NSFW. 

Good stuff, good stuff! So much awesomeness in 8 pages.

really loved this.

I should probably wait until tomorrow to tumbl this, but it’s too exciting and I can’t wait. Look at this Wind Waker drawing I did of Link & Medli, made into an adorable masterwork by colourist extraordinaire Jordie Bellaire! :D Oh my, it’s absolutely gorgeous. *_*

I should probably wait until tomorrow to tumbl this, but it’s too exciting and I can’t wait. Look at this Wind Waker drawing I did of Link & Medli, made into an adorable masterwork by colourist extraordinaire Jordie Bellaire! :D Oh my, it’s absolutely gorgeous. *_*

Some kids I’m writing a story about. 

Some kids I’m writing a story about. 

this week we have had 1) snow 2) +12 degree Celsius temperatures 3) today it is -4 C.
*sobs*

this week we have had 1) snow 2) +12 degree Celsius temperatures 3) today it is -4 C.

*sobs*

(Source: whatsdifferentincanada)

kateoplis:

“The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. Frozen. Gravity. Three of last year’s top 10 grossing films were led by female protagonists, making 2013 a banner year for women in film, right?
Not quite. Women accounted for less than a third of all speaking roles in the year’s 100 top-grossing domestic films. And just 15 percent of those films had women in leading roles.”
Percentage of female speaking roles same as 1940s

I’ve already RTed this, but it’s worth putting on tumblr as well. The very sorry state of women in movies. 
I think a lot about women who make comics (seeing how I am one), and how on many levels the comics industry has experienced explosive growth in women readers, and possibly in women creators. When you get to really high levels in comics and focus exclusively on publishers like Marvel, DC, Image, etc the number of women creating seems to drop, but if you look at ALL of comics, including self-published comics and webcomics there are significantly more women creating. I know for myself that I started making comics because there was no one who could tell me that I couldn’t. I think a lot about the internet and how it’s possibly facilitated a huge influx of woman comic creators, because it lowered the bar for entry into the industry. Woman creators didn’t have to draw in a narrow superhero art style or tell stories that were potentially unappealing to them if they wanted to make comics. The internet (and self publishing) was there to provide them with readers (although possibly not money) for whatever comic they chose to make.
I remember a very brief snippet of an interview with Lena Dunham (creator of the HBO show Girls) in Keanu Reeves’ documentary Side by Side where she talked about how working digitally as a filmmaker had been very important to her: its barrier of entry/learning curve was less steep than going out and renting film cameras and trying to work with a cinematographer. Digital film-making allowed Dunham to experiment with the art form of film in a way she might not have attempted if it wasn’t available to her.
Anyway, I think about this in regards to women in film, whether or not the lowering of barriers of entry through technology and the internet will encourage more women to get into film. Film isn’t my industry, so I don’t know, but clearly there are more barriers in place than in comics. Comics have changed so much in the past twenty years, it’s now at a point where as a female reader I feel pretty catered to by publishers (with some exceptions). But I hardly go to movies anymore because it seems like they do not want me as a viewer. 

kateoplis:

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. Frozen. Gravity. Three of last year’s top 10 grossing films were led by female protagonists, making 2013 a banner year for women in film, right?

Not quite. Women accounted for less than a third of all speaking roles in the year’s 100 top-grossing domestic films. And just 15 percent of those films had women in leading roles.”

Percentage of female speaking roles same as 1940s

I’ve already RTed this, but it’s worth putting on tumblr as well. The very sorry state of women in movies. 

I think a lot about women who make comics (seeing how I am one), and how on many levels the comics industry has experienced explosive growth in women readers, and possibly in women creators. When you get to really high levels in comics and focus exclusively on publishers like Marvel, DC, Image, etc the number of women creating seems to drop, but if you look at ALL of comics, including self-published comics and webcomics there are significantly more women creating. I know for myself that I started making comics because there was no one who could tell me that I couldn’t. I think a lot about the internet and how it’s possibly facilitated a huge influx of woman comic creators, because it lowered the bar for entry into the industry. Woman creators didn’t have to draw in a narrow superhero art style or tell stories that were potentially unappealing to them if they wanted to make comics. The internet (and self publishing) was there to provide them with readers (although possibly not money) for whatever comic they chose to make.

I remember a very brief snippet of an interview with Lena Dunham (creator of the HBO show Girls) in Keanu Reeves’ documentary Side by Side where she talked about how working digitally as a filmmaker had been very important to her: its barrier of entry/learning curve was less steep than going out and renting film cameras and trying to work with a cinematographer. Digital film-making allowed Dunham to experiment with the art form of film in a way she might not have attempted if it wasn’t available to her.

Anyway, I think about this in regards to women in film, whether or not the lowering of barriers of entry through technology and the internet will encourage more women to get into film. Film isn’t my industry, so I don’t know, but clearly there are more barriers in place than in comics. Comics have changed so much in the past twenty years, it’s now at a point where as a female reader I feel pretty catered to by publishers (with some exceptions). But I hardly go to movies anymore because it seems like they do not want me as a viewer. 

(via tederick)